Bad but bold: Ambivalent attitudes toward men predict gender inequality in 16 nations

2004-05-01
GLİCK, P
LAMEİRAS, M
FİSKE, ST
ECKES, T
MASSER, B
VOLPATO, C
MANGANELLİ, AM
PEK, JCX
HUANG, LL
Sakallı, Nuray
CASTRO, YR
PEREIRA, MLD
WILLEMSEN, TM
BRUNNER, A
Six-Materna, I
WELLS, R
A 16-nation study involving 8,360 participants revealed that hostile and benevolent attitudes toward men, assessed by the Ambivalence Toward Men Inventory (P. Glick & S. T. Fiske, 1999), were (a) reliably measured across cultures, (b) positively correlated (for men and women, within samples and across nations) with each other and with hostile and benevolent sexism toward women (Ambivalent Sexism Inventory, P. Glick & S. T. Fiske, 1996), and (c) negatively correlated with gender equality in cross-national comparisons. Stereotype measures indicated that men were viewed as having less positively valenced but more powerful traits than women. The authors argue that hostile as well as benevolent attitudes toward men reflect and support gender inequality by characterizing men as being designed for dominance.
JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

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Citation Formats
P. GLİCK et al., “Bad but bold: Ambivalent attitudes toward men predict gender inequality in 16 nations,” JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, pp. 713–728, 2004, Accessed: 00, 2020. [Online]. Available: https://hdl.handle.net/11511/38073.