The distinction between unaccusative and unergative verbs in Turkish An offline and an eye tracking study of split intransitivity

2014-07-31
Melda, Coşkun
Acartürk, Cengiz
The Unaccusativity Hypothesis (UH) holds that intransitive verbs are divided into two broad classes, namely unaccusatives and unergatives. While there is evidence that the UH holds cross-linguistically, it is known that languages do not divide the intransitives into two uniform groups. We investigate the unaccusative-unergative distinction in Turkish by an offline grammaticality judgment task using a visual analog scale and by running an eye tracking experiment to tap on cognitive processing of split intransitivity. Cluster analyses indicate that the results of two experiments are broadly compatible, i.e., native speakers represent intransitive verbs in two classes, as the UH predicts. However, the offline experiment results specify uncontrolled process verbs as unaccusative, whereas the eye-gaze data characterize them as unergative. This result lends partial support for Auxiliary Selection Hierarchy. We also suggest that the uncontrolled process verb class might be where the unaccusativeunergative split occurs in Turkish
Citation Formats
C. Melda and C. Acartürk, “The distinction between unaccusative and unergative verbs in Turkish An offline and an eye tracking study of split intransitivity,” 2014, Accessed: 00, 2021. [Online]. Available: https://mindmodeling.org/cogsci2014/.