Observations of the unidentified TeV gamma-ray source TeV J2032+4130 with the Whipple Observatory 10 m telescope

2007-04-01
Konopelko, A.
Atkins, R. W.
Blaylock, G.
Buckley, J. H.
Butt, Y.
Carter-Lewis, D. A.
Celik, O.
Cogan, P.
Chow, Y. C. K.
Cui, W.
Dowdall, C.
Ergin, Tülün
Falcone, A. D.
Fegan, D. J.
Fegan, S. J.
Finley, J. P.
Fortin, P.
Gillanders, G. H.
Gutierrez, K. J.
Hall, J.
Hanna, D.
Horan, D.
Hughes, S. B.
Humensky, T. B.
Imran, A.
Jung, I.
Kaaret, P.
Kenny, G. E.
Kertzman, M.
Kieda, D. B.
Kildea, J.
Knapp, J.
Kosack, K.
Krawczynski, H.
Krennrich, F.
Lang, M. J.
LeBohec, S.
Moriarty, P.
Mukherjee, R.
Nagai, T.
Ong, R. A.
Perkins, J. S.
Pohl, M.
Ragan, K.
Reynolds, P. T.
Rose, H. J.
Sembroski, G. H.
Schroedter, M.
Smith, A. W.
Steele, D.
Syson, A.
Swordy, S. P.
Toner, J. A.
Valcarcel, L.
Vassiliev, V. V.
Wagner, R. G.
Wakely, S. P.
Weekes, T. C.
White, R. J.
Williams, D. A.
Zitzer, B.
We report on observations of the sky region around the unidentified TeV gamma-ray source (TeV J2032+ 4130) carried out with the Whipple Observatory 10 m atmospheric Cerenkov telescope for a total of 65.5 hr between 2003 and 2005. The standard two-dimensional analysis developed by the Whipple collaboration for a stand-alone telescope reveals an excess in the field of view at a pretrial significance level of 6.1 sigma. The measured position of this excess is alpha = 20(h)32(m)27(s), delta = 41 degrees 39'17" (J2000.0). The estimated integral flux for this gamma-ray source is about 8% of the Crab Nebula flux. The data are consistent with a pointlike source. Here we present a detailed description of the standard two-dimensional analysis technique used for the analysis of data taken with the Whipple Observatory 10 m telescope and the results for the TeV J2032+ 4130 campaign. We include a short discussion of the physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed gamma-ray emission, based on possible association with known astrophysical objects, in particular, Cygnus OB2.