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EFFECT OF POROSITY ON INTERFACIAL FAILURE IN STEEL-FIBER-REINFORCED POLYMER-IMPREGNATED CONCRETE

1988-01-01
Gündüz, Güngör
The interfacial bond between a steel fibre and concrete generally increases with the polymer content. Naphthalene used to generate new pores in order t increase the polymer loading and thus to increase the interfacial bond strength has a positive effect up to 3% by weight. Higher amounts weaken the cementitious phase and also decrease the amount of polymer incorporated. Drying of concrete before impregnation at 150°C rather than at 105°C increases the polymer loading and thus the interfacial bond strength. An increase in polymer loading without changing the original porosity, as in pressure or vacuum impregnation, increases the interfacial bond strength. Vacuum impregnation gives a higher interfacial bond strength than pressure impregnation. This could be due to the diffusion of monomer molecules into evacuated micro-pores. Thus, improved adhesion can be achieved between the polymer and the cemetiitious phase and steel fibre by means of vacuum impregnation.