An analysis of gender issues in the lost girl and the plumed serpent by D.H. Lawrence

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2005
Akgün, Ela
This thesis analyzes the ways how David Herbert Lawrence advocates sexual politics in his novels The Lost Girl and The Plumed Serpent. The thesis argues that although D.H. Lawrence portrays modern women̕s search for identity in The Lost Girl and The Plumed Serpent, his attitude is that of a very conventional man who advertises his male fantasies through female characters; and the gender role that he finally assigns to women is unquestioning submissiveness to male authority. The power relations between sexes and the depiction of modern woman in both novels are analyzed as propagandas of patriarchy. This thesis makes use of feminist reading which requires analyses of texts with reference to behavioral codes that are incorporated in the novels and to the systematic patriarchal propaganda which is imposed through textual strategies. The reason for choosing this method of analysis for the present study is to trace the ways in which sexual politics operate within the novels The Lost Girl and The Plumed Serpent by D.H. Lawrence.

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Citation Formats
E. Akgün, “An analysis of gender issues in the lost girl and the plumed serpent by D.H. Lawrence,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2005.