‘Fabulation’ of metanarratives in julian barnes’s novels metroland, flaubert’s parrot, a history of the world in 10 ½ chapters, and england, England

Download
2009
Salman, Volhan
The present thesis argues that the present era of post-postmodernism experiences a revival of revised metanarratives through ‘fabulation’, the process masterfully depicted in Julian Barnes’s novels Metroland (1980), Flaubert’s Parrot (1984), History of the World in 10 ½ Chapters (1989) and England, England (1998). The age of postmodernism with its undermining irony, hopelessness, pessimism and the sense of the looming end could not but leave the world in a state of despair, characterised by a propagated rule of the simulacra and the subaltern, hybridism, uncertainty, absence and inconclusiveness. As a result, the world witnessed the appearance of various calls for the re-institution of metanarratives as the only cure to rescue mankind from continuous deferral of signification, which tends to feel secure only with a score of guiding narratives. The same holds true of Julian Barnes’s fiction. While many consider the writer’s works to be typically postmodern, it is far from being so, as alongside the propagation of multiplicity and flexibility of meaning, it emphasises the existence of the Truth and the necessity to fabulate metanarratives, which are the only guiding poles in human progress through life in post-postmodernism.

Suggestions

Features of renaissance individualism and references yo Machiavellian politics in Christopher Marlowe's the new of Malta, the tragical history of doctor Faustus and Tamburlaine, the great
Eryılmaz, Ayşe Pırıl; Alpakın Martınez Caro, Dürrin; Department of Foreign Language Education (2007)
This thesis analyses the Machiavellian concepts of cunning, cruelty and opportunism as well as self-determination and individualism with regard to the major characters in Christopher Marlowe's plays, The Jew of Malta, The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus and Tamburlaine, Parts 1 and 2. The thesis then examines these characters' scales of achievement as individuals who challenge the established order. Finally, the thesis clarifies whether these characters are theatrical representatives of the Renaissance i...
A Study of feminist possibilities of escape from the panopticon and the male gaze in Pat Barker’s Union street and Angela Carter’s Nights at the circus
Atar, Merve; Öztabak Avcı, Elif; Department of English Literature (2016)
The aim of this thesis is to study Pat Barker’s Union Street (1982) and Angela Carter’s Nights at the Circus (1984) to explore the novels’ treatment of how modern institutions discipline women in the light of Foucault’s conceptualization of the “Panopticon” in his Discipline and Punish (1977). This study will also be attentive to the works of feminist scholars such as Sandra Lee Bartky and Susan Bordo, who in their articles “Foucault, Femininity, and the Modernization of Patriarchal Power” (1988) and “The B...
Theatricality and the chronotope in "The Magus" by J. Fowles and "England, England" by J. Barnes
Filimonova, Alexandra; Sönmez, Margaret Jeanne M.; Department of English Language Teaching (2009)
The thesis reveals the main principles of the theatrical chronotope and examines the ways in which it is embodied in the novels of two postmodern authors – The Magus by John Fowles and England, England by Julian Barnes. These are analyzed as presenting two different variants of texts that employ the theatrical chronotope to exploit its different possible semantic implications. The thesis argues that in The Magus theatricality is employed to convey the author’s philosophical and aesthetical thoughts. The mai...
Rereading Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice and Richard II : Wesker's The Merchant and Ioneco's Exit the King
Altındağ, Zümrüt; Norman, Ünal; Department of Foreign Language Education (2004)
This thesis is a comparative study of how Shakespeare̕s ideas transcend the boundaries of his own time and still remain as the major sources of inspiration for modern dramatists. Arnold Wesker and Eugéne Ionesco explore the concept of the "other" leading to loss of identity and awareness of non-being embedded in Shakespeare̕s works. The main argument is that the contemporary playwrights reinterpret Shakespeare̕s works in the light of some modern issues and ideas to reveal the entrapment of the individual.
History of the novel in stories of femininity: Moll flanders, Evelina and Fordyce’s sermons /
Kaya, Tuğba Billur; Yıldız Bağçe, Hülya; Department of English Literature (2015)
In this study the rise of the English novel is investigated from the perspective of Nancy Armstrong’s Desire and Domestic Fiction which put forward that the novel genre emerged out of the conduct books of seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Within this scope two of the first English novels Moll Flanders (1742) by Daniel Defoe and Evelina (1778) by Frances Burney will be studied side-by-side by comparing their plots with one of the most popular conduct books of the era: Fordyce’s Sermons. The study aims to...
Citation Formats
V. Salman, “‘Fabulation’ of metanarratives in julian barnes’s novels metroland, flaubert’s parrot, a history of the world in 10 ½ chapters, and england, England,” Ph.D. - Doctoral Program, Middle East Technical University, 2009.