Investigation of the potential correlation between the cognitive performance and levels of brain fatty acids in young and aged mice

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2011
Yetimler, Berrak
The aim of the present study was to elucidate the possible relationship between the levels of various brain fatty acids and learning indices in aged and young mice classified as “good” or “poor” learners basing on their performance in a spatial learning task, the Morris Water Maze. The levels of several fatty acids including palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were measured using gas chromatography separately in samples from four different brain areas: hippocampus, cortex, striatum and hypothalamus. The level of oleic acid in the cerebral cortex was significantly higher in young-good learners as compared to young-poor learners and higher in young-poor learners than in old-poor learners, with no significant difference in the concentration of this acid between old-good and old-poor learners. The most consistent correlation between animals’ learning capacity and brain fatty acid’ level was found for the arachidonic acid in the hippocampal region: AA level was significantly lower in young-good learners as compared to both young-poor learners” and old-good learners” with young-good learners showing significantly better performance than the two other groups. Interestingly, except hypothalamus, no significant between-group differences were recorded for the remaining fatty acids including DHA, in none of the four brain regions examined.
Citation Formats
B. Yetimler, “Investigation of the potential correlation between the cognitive performance and levels of brain fatty acids in young and aged mice,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2011.