Domestic violence against women in relations to marital adjustment and psychological well-being, with the effects of attachment, marital coping, and social support

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2012
Tuncay-Senlet, Ece
This study was designed to examine the relationships of multiple types of domestic victimization (i.e., physical, psychological, sexual, and economic violence) to women’s marital adjustment and psychological well-being, together with their socio-demographic characteristics and attachment, marital coping, and social support aspects. Altogether 524 married women provided data on domestic violence (Revised Conflict Tactics Scale), economic violence (Economic Violence Index), attachment (couples version of Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised), marital coping (Marital Coping Inventory), social support (Social Support Index), dyadic adjustment (Dyadic Adjustment Scale), psychological well-being (Brief Symptom Inventory), as well as demographic information. Results appeared to indicate a general tendency that women who have arranged marriages, more children, low education, low educated husbands, no or low income, and/or women who have more income compared to their husbands report higher levels of multiple types of domestic violence. Furthermore, the findings indicated that multiple types of domestic violence account for significant variances in marital adjustment and psychological well-being of married women, even after controlling for their attachment dimensions, marital coping strategies, and social support from different support groups. The findings were discussed in accordance with the relevant literature, and their implications for clinical practices and future studies were suggested.
Citation Formats
E. Tuncay-Senlet, “Domestic violence against women in relations to marital adjustment and psychological well-being, with the effects of attachment, marital coping, and social support,” Ph.D. - Doctoral Program, Middle East Technical University, 2012.