A Study on career indecision of11th and 12th grade students : testing gender, career beliefs, academic self-efficacy and problem solving skills through path analysis

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2014
Yalım Yaman, Desen
The aim of the current study was to examine some factors that contribute to career decision making of 11th and 12th grade students within the context of the Learning Theory of Career Counseling (LTCC; Krumboltz, 1996). Specifically, the study examined to what extend the variables of gender, career beliefs, self-efficacy and problem solving skills and their relationship predict career indecision. The sample was composed of 409 (234 female, 175male) 11th and 12th grade students whose ranged between 16-18 (M = 16.48, SD = 3.04). The Career Beliefs Inventory (Krumboltz, 1991), Academic Self-Efficacy Scale (Jerusalem & Schwarzer, 1981; Yılmaz, Gürçay & Ekici, 2007), Problem Solving Skills Inventory (Heppner, 1988; Şahin, Şahin & Heppner, 1993), Career Decision Scale (Büyükgöze-Kavas, 2010; Osipow et al., 1976) and Demographic Information Form were used as data collection instruments. In the current study, a path model was proposed to examine the relationships between the predicting variables of gender, career beliefs, academic self-efficacy problem solving skills and their impacts on career indecision. Results of the path analyses indicated four nonsignificant paths. Thus, these paths were trimmed and eliminated from the proposed model. The trimmed model accounted for 18% of the variance in career indecision. The findings of the study showed that career indecision was negatively affected by problem solving skills, gender, and career beliefs. In addition, academic self-efficacy was indirectly related to career indecision. Overall, findings indicated that eventhough the hypothesized model that based on variables from Krumboltz’s Learning Theory of Career Counseling (LTCC; Krumboltz, 1996) was not supported by the data, the trimmed model showed mediating role of task approach skills (academic self-efficacy and problem solving skills) through gender and career beliefs in predicting career indecision.
Citation Formats
D. Yalım Yaman, “A Study on career indecision of11th and 12th grade students : testing gender, career beliefs, academic self-efficacy and problem solving skills through path analysis,” Ph.D. - Doctoral Program, Middle East Technical University, 2014.