Comparing fathers and mothers: determinants of why they involve in their children’s education

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2017
Ertan, Nisan Cansu
This study aimed to (1) compare fathers and mothers on their determinants of why they involve in their children’s education who enrolled to preschool, (2) investigate how well parents’ motivational beliefs on their involvement can be predicted by parents’ perceptions of invitations from others for the involvement and parents’ self-perceived life context on their involvement, and (3) examine the possible effects of demographic variables (parents’ age, educational level, occupation, and age of their child) on the determinants of why parents involve. The sample of the study consisted of 404 fathers and 437 mothers of preschoolers in four urban districts of Ankara. An empirical test of Hoover-Dempsey & Sandler’s (1995, 2005) parent involvement model’s first level was conducted on the collected data. In the first level of their model, the determinants of why parents involve were handled. The scales that were used in this study were developed by Walker et al. (2005). The results collected by the related scales indicated that mothers obtained higher mean scores than fathers in each scale. Multivariate analysis of variance results also revealed that the mothers again obtained slightly higher scores than the fathers except in the parental role activity beliefs sub-construct. Multiple regression analysis results indicated that parents’ perceptions of invitations from others for the involvement and parents’ self-perceived life context on their involvement are predictors of parents’ motivational beliefs on parent involvement. Finally, analysis of variance results showed that the demographic variables had no significant effect on the determinants of why parents involve. 
Citation Formats
N. C. Ertan, “Comparing fathers and mothers: determinants of why they involve in their children’s education,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2017.