Cross-cultural differences in driver aggression, aberrant, and positive driver behaviors

2020-05-01
ERSAN, ÖZLEM
ÜZÜMCÜOĞLU ZİHNİ, YEŞİM
Azık Özkan, Derya
Fındık, Gizem
Kacan, Bilgesu
SOLMAZER, GAYE
Özkan, Türker
Lajunen, Timo
Öz, Bahar
Pashkevich, Anton
Pashkevich, Maria
Danelli-Mylona, Vassiliki
Georgogianni, Dimitra
Krasniqi, Ema Berisha
Krasniqi, Muhamed
Makris, Evangelos
Shubenkova, Ksenia
Xheladini, Gentiane
The present study investigated differences in driver aggression for self and others within countries and cultural differences between driver aggression, aberrant, and positive driver behaviors across five countries (Estonia, Greece, Kosovo, Russia, and Turkey). It was predicted that drivers from these five countries differ significantly in terms of driver aggression for self and others, aberrant, and positive driver behaviors. In the study, 743 participants completed the questionnaire package, including the Driver Aggression Indicators Scale (DAIS), the short version of the Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) with items from the Positive Driver Behavior Scale, and the Demographic Information Form. Paired samples T-tests were conducted to examine the differences in driving aggression between self and others in the five countries. The results indicated that, except for Russian drivers, drivers reported that other drivers had higher driver aggression than themselves. To examine the cross-cultural differences, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) tests were conducted for the two dimensions of the DAIS (hostile aggression and revenge, and aggressive warnings) and the three dimensions of the DBQ with items from the Positive Driver Behavior Scale (errors, violations, and positive driver behaviors). Cross-country item-based comparisons were then made for the DAIS and the DBQ. The ANCOVA results showed significant differences in both item-based and subscale comparisons. Russian drivers were significantly different from other drivers in terms of hostile aggression and the revenge subscales of the DAIS and positive driver behaviors. Turkish drivers were significantly different from other drivers in several items of the DBQ, including errors and violations. The findings suggest that culture-specific strategies might be conducted for traffic-related anger management. Furthermore, differences in errors and violations among the five countries may be due to cultural differences. Positive driver behaviors might be better promoted in countries by drawing on their distinct cultural road safety strategies.
TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH PART F-TRAFFIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR

Suggestions

Cross-cultural differences in pedestrian behaviors in relation to values: A comparison of five countries
Solmazer, Gaye; Azık Özkan, Derya; Fındık, Gizem; ÜZÜMCÜOĞLU ZİHNİ, YEŞİM; ERSAN, ÖZLEM; Kacan, Bilgesu; Özkan, Türker; Lajunen, Timo; Öz, Bahar; Pashkevich, Anton; Pashkevich, Maria; Danelli-Mylona, Vassiliki; Georgogianni, Dimitra; Krasniqi, Ema Berisha; Krasniqi, Muhamed; Makris, Evangelos; Shubenkova, Ksenia; Xheladini, Gentiane (2020-04-01)
This study compared pedestrian behaviors in five countries (Estonia, Greece, Kosovo, Russia, and Turkey) and investigated the relationships between these behaviors and values in each country. The study participants were 131 pedestrians for Estonia, 249 for Greece, 112 for Kosovo, 176 for Russia, and 145 for Turkey. The principal component analyses revealed that the four-factor structure of the Pedestrian Behavior Scale (PBS) was highly consistent across the five countries. ANCOVA results revealed significan...
Cross-cultural differences in driving behaviours: A comparison of six countries
Özkan, Türker; Chliaoutakis, Joannes El.; PARKER, Dianne; SUMMALA, Heikki (2006-05-01)
The first aim of the present study was to investigate the applicability of the three-factor structure (aggressive violations, ordinary violations, and errors) of the Manchester Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ) and then to compare these driving behaviours across the six countries (Finland, Great Britain, Greece, Iran, The Netherlands, and Turkey). The third aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of driving styles in the relationship between traffic cultures (countries) and the number of traffi...
The relationship between self and other in aggressive driving and driver behaviors across countries
Ersan, Özlem; Üzümcüoğlu, Yeşim; Azık, Derya; Fındık, Gizem; Kaçan, Bilgesu; Solmazer, Gaye; Özkan, Türker; Lajunen, Timo; Öz, Bahar; Pashkevich, Anton; Pashkevich, Maria; Danelli-Mylona, Vassiliki; Georgogianni, Dimitra; Krasniqi, Ema Berisha; Krasniqi, Muhamed; Makris, Evangelos; Shubenkova, Ksenia; Xheladini, Gentianë (Elsevier BV, 2019-10-01)
The main aim of the present study was to investigate the moderating role of aggressive driving of others on the relationship between self-reported aggressive driving behaviors committed by driver himself/herself and drivers’ aberrant and positive driver behaviors (i.e. errors, violations, and positive driver behaviors) among drivers from Estonia, Greece, Kosovo, Russia, and Turkey as the total sample in order to understand the grand pattern. The other aim was to examine the same moderating role of aggressiv...
Symmetric Relationship Between Self and Others in Aggressive Driving Across Gender and Countries
Özkan, Türker; Parker, Dianne; Sumer, NEBİ; Summala, Heikki (2010-01-01)
Objective: It was hypothesized that the combination of self-reported aggressive behaviors committed by the driver himself/herself (oselfo scale) and perceiving himself/herself as an object of other drivers' aggressive acts (oothero scale) increases road accident involvement risk across gender and countries. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate this symmetric relationship between aggressive driving of self and other and its relationship on accident involvement among British, Dutch, Finnish, a...
Professional and non-professional drivers' stress reactions and risky driving
Öz, Bahar; Özkan, Türker (2010-01-01)
The aim of the present study was to investigate stress reactions, speeding, number of penalties and accident involvement among different driver groups (taxi drivers, minibus drivers, heavy vehicle drivers, and non-professional drivers). A total number of 234 male drivers participated in the study. The participants were asked to complete the Driver Stress Inventory (DSI) together with a demographic information form. Five dimensions of the DSI were measured; aggression, dislike of driving, hazard monitoring, ...
Citation Formats
Ö. ERSAN et al., “Cross-cultural differences in driver aggression, aberrant, and positive driver behaviors,” TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH PART F-TRAFFIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR, pp. 88–97, 2020, Accessed: 00, 2020. [Online]. Available: https://hdl.handle.net/11511/32450.