RELATIVELY COMPLETELY HAPPY

2007-06-22
This paper tries to formulate a link between a phenomenological description of certain experiences of the co-presence of the past, present and future with the scientific theory of the block model of the universe that is based on the Einstein-Minkovski conception of spacetime. The argument that is constructed to this end utilizes Whitehead's process metaphysics. Using Whiteheads attack on the bifurcation of nature problem as my springboard, I argue that even though the passage of time as described in the block model of the universe transcends our perception of nature (i.e., the 4-dimensional space-time transcends passage of time as we perceive it), this transcendence need not introduce an unbridgeable gap between appearance and reality. I then make use of Reiser's application of Whitehead's metaphysics to Gestalt psychology to provide an explanation of our perception of time from a scientific point of view that does not conceptualize mental spacetime as bifurcated from physical spacetime. Finally, I argue, using Whiteheadian concepts, that it is possible to apprehend the block universe through sensuous experience.

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Citation Formats
B. Parkan, “RELATIVELY COMPLETELY HAPPY,” 2007, vol. 102, Accessed: 00, 2020. [Online]. Available: https://hdl.handle.net/11511/47826.