The relationship between carbon dioxide emissions, electricity production and consumption in Ghana

2017-01-01
Asumadu-Sarkodie, Samuel
Owusu, Phebe Asantewaa
The study investigated the relationship between carbon dioxide, electricity production, and consumption in Ghana using the autoregressive distributed lag model by employing a time-series data spanning from 1971 to 2012. Evidence from the long-run elasticities shows that a 1% increase in the total energy production from combustible renewables and waste will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 307.9 kt in the long run. In contrast, a 1% increase in the total energy production with electricity production from hydroelectric sources will decrease carbon dioxide emissions by 267.3 kt in the long run. There was evidence of a bidirectional causality from electricity production from hydroelectric sources to carbon dioxide emissions and a unidirectional causality from carbon dioxide emissions to the total energy production with combustible renewables and waste; carbon dioxide emissions to electricity production from oil, gas, and coal sources; electric power consumption to the total energy production with combustible renewables; and waste and electricity production from hydroelectric sources to electricity production from oil, gas, and coal sources. Ghana's electricity production and consumption from non-renewable sources of energy escalates carbon dioxide emissions while renewable sources help mitigate climate change and its impact.

Citation Formats
S. Asumadu-Sarkodie and P. A. Owusu, “The relationship between carbon dioxide emissions, electricity production and consumption in Ghana,” ENERGY SOURCES PART B-ECONOMICS PLANNING AND POLICY, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 547–558, 2017, Accessed: 00, 2020. [Online]. Available: https://hdl.handle.net/11511/65506.