BIODIVERSITY ASSESSMENT OF FISHES AND INVERTEBRATES IN MERSIN BAY, THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA, BY USING DNA BARCODING

2016-9-25
Çiftçi, Ozan
Cataloguing the biodiversity of marine ecosystems is critical for several implications: e.g. protecting species under threat, detecting alien species or ecosystem based management etc. The eastern Mediterranean Sea is a hot spot for bioinvasion, however its biodiversity had been poorly studied. In the view of the ongoing changes in the Mediterranean, fish and invertebrate biodiversity of Mersin Bay were evaluated in this study by using DNA barcoding techniques, based on the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, coupled with morphological identifications of specimens. Sampling was performed by trawl surveys in Mersin Bay between May 2014 and June 2015. All fish specimens were identified to species level by morphological examination and invertebrate species were categorized initially and later identified by molecular analyses. As a result, 186 marine specimens, 101 of which are fish, 29 arthropods, 35 mollusks, 6 annelids, 2 polychaetes, 9 echinoderms and 4 ascidians were analyzed using both methods. Out of 36 fish species analyzed, 14 were Lessepsian migrants. An Indo-Pacific anchovy species, Encrasicholina punctifer, is recorded for the first time in the Mediterranean ichthyofauna. Barcode records of 23 fish and 18 invertebrate species for Turkey and of 6 invertebrate species for the Mediterranean Sea were provided for the first time with this study. The sequence data, trace files and specimen details were submitted to the Barcode of Life Data System (BOLD; Ratnasingham and Hebert, 2007). Genetic divergence increased with higher taxonomic level. Conspecific and congeneric distances were 0.66% and 14.84% for fish species, while 0.99% and 13.58% for invertebrate species, respectively. In general, specimen identifications and biodiversity measures were consistent with taxonomic status and earlier studies demonstrating the usefulness and efficiency of the method.

Suggestions

Effects of climate change on biodiversity: a case study on four plant species using distribution models
Beton, Damla; Bilgin, Cemal Can; Department of Biology (2011)
Conservation strategies are mainly focused on species existing in an environment shaped by natural and anthropogenic pressures. Yet, evidence shows that climate is changing faster than ever and expected to continue to change in the near future, which can be devastating for plants with restricted ranges. Turkey harbors many endemic species that might be affected from these changes. However, available data is scarce and biased, complicating the anticipation of future changes. Aim of this study is to improve o...
Biomass changes and trophic amplification of plankton in a warmer ocean
Chust, Guillem; et. al. (2014-07-01)
Ocean warming can modify the ecophysiology and distribution of marine organisms, and relationships between species, with nonlinear interactions between ecosystem components potentially resulting in trophic amplification. Trophic amplification (or attenuation) describe the propagation of a hydroclimatic signal up the food web, causing magnification (or depression) of biomass values along one or more trophic pathways. We have employed 3-D coupled physical-biogeochemical models to explore ecosystem responses t...
Non-native Fish Occurrence and Biomass in 1943 Western Palearctic Lakes and Reservoirs and their Abiotic and Biotic Correlates
Trochine, Carolina; Brucet, Sandra; Argillier, Christine; Arranz, Ignasi; Beklioğlu, Meryem; Benejam, Lluis; Ferreira, Teresa; Hesthagen, Trygve; Holmgren, Kerstin; Jeppesen, Erik; Kelly, Fiona; Krause, Teet; Rask, Martti; Volta, Pietro; Winfield, Ian J.; Mehner, Thomas (2018-04-01)
Invasion of non-native species is considered a major threat to global biodiversity. Here we present a comprehensive overview of the occurrence, richness and biomass contribution of non-native fish species in 1943 standing water bodies from 14 countries of the Western Palearctic, based on standardised fish catches by multi-mesh gillnetting. We expected strong geographical gradients to emerge in the occurrence of non-natives. We further hypothesised that the contribution by non-natives to the local fish commu...
Adaptive strategies to mitigate the impacts of climate change on European freshwater ecosystems (REFRESH)
Beklioğlu, Meryem(2014-1-31)
Understanding how freshwater ecosystems will respond to future climate change is essential for the development of policies and implementation strategies needed to protect aquatic and riparian ecosystems. The future status of freshwater ecosystems is however, also dependent on changes in land-use, pollution loading and water demand. In addition the measures that need to be taken to restore freshwater ecosystems to good ecological health or to sustain priority species as required by EU Directives need to be d...
Re-evaluated conservation status of Salvia (sage) in Turkey I: The Mediterranean and the Aegean geographic regions
CELEP, FERHAT; Doğan, Musa; Kahraman, Ahmet (2010-01-01)
The precise evaluation of the conservation status of endemic and rare species is necessary in order to prevent their extinction. According to our current taxonomic revision of Turkish Salvia L., the Mediterranean and Aegean geographic regions of Turkey have 60 taxa, 32 of which are endemic (mainly local endemics), 5 of which are non-endemic rare, and the remaining 23 taxa are widely distributed. The rate of endemism is 53% in the area. The destruction of habitat through human encroachment such as urbanisati...
Citation Formats
O. Çiftçi, “BIODIVERSITY ASSESSMENT OF FISHES AND INVERTEBRATES IN MERSIN BAY, THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA, BY USING DNA BARCODING,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2016.