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Effect of instruction using conceptual change strategies on students' conceptions of chemical reactions and energy

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2004
Ceylan, Eren
The main purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of the conceptual change oriented instruction through demonstration and traditionally designed chemistry instruction on 10th grade students̕ understanding of chemical reactions and energy concepts and attitudes towards chemistry as a school subject. In this study, 61 tenth grade students from two classes of chemistry course instructed by same teacher from Atatürk Anatolian High School took part. The study was conducted during 2003-2004 fall semester. This study included two groups which were selected randomly throughout 9 classes. One of the group was defined as control group in which students were taught by traditionally designed chemistry instruction, while the other group defined as experimental group in which students were instructed by conceptual change oriented instruction through demonstrations (CCID). Chemical Reactions and Energy Concepts Test and Attitude Scale toward Chemistry were administered to both groups as a pre-test and post-test to assess the students understanding of chemical reactions and energy concepts and students̕ attitudes toward chemistry, respectively. Science Process Skills Test was given at the beginning of the study to determine students̕ science process skills. The hypotheses were tested by using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results showed that CCID caused significantly better acquisition of the scientific conceptions related to chemical reactions and energy concepts than TDCI. The results showed that there was a significant difference between post-test mean scores of students taught with CCID and those taught with TDCI with respect to their attitude toward chemistry as a school subject. A Science process skill was determined as a strong predictor in understanding the concepts related chemical reactions and energy.