Nietzsche and the human rights

Download
2006
Altun, Damla
Today the conception of human rights is an idea that preserves its intransitive, inalienable and indivisible quality with a cross-cultural reference. The idea of human rights, entering our lives from the 18th century onwards, has gained a worldwide recognition through the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The idea occupies place both at the level of rules and principles as a project and at the level of our daily problem solutions, modifications and the daily course of our lives as a pragmatics. The political framework provides the idea of human rights such a justification that it constitutes a significant part of our decisions, thoughts and actions. On the other hand, the grounds of the idea has been questioned as a part of the Enlightenment project since it was first articulated and especially in recent decades certain radical criticisms originating from Nietzche’s thought became prevalent. The thesis questions this easy alliance between Nietzsche and radical attacks to human rights thought. In the first chapter, I first provided a brief historical overview of the idea of human rights. Then, I had a closer look towards the principles of universality, equality, autonomy and is-ought distinction with special reference to Kantian formulations of these concepts and in the second chapter, I elaborate Nietzsche’s perception of these same principles and our understanding of conventional morality in general, to reach an articulated answer to the question: Would Nietzsche be categorically against human rights? I conclude that his philosophical attitude to these four principles differ from each other. In this context the thesis regards Nietzschean informal structures over the Kantian formal ones as complementary for a full grasp of the idea of human rights by offering a connection of the transitionality between Kant and Nietzsche.

Suggestions

Evaluating the human rights of stateless people: reflections of Arendt, Agamben, and Ranciere
Türkdoğan, Elçin; Deveci, Cem; Department of Political Science and Public Administration (2011)
As it is widely accepted, human rights are inalienable and equal rights that we have simply because we are human. They are guaranteed to all people regardless of their nationality, race, sex, ethnicity, etc. Moreover, they are rights that their holder cannot lose them temporarily or permanently. Yet, today many millions people around the world are denied to exercise their most basic human rights because they are not citizen of any country. They are stateless people. Although there have been many internation...
Discourse on human rights : representation of the idea in Turkish human right
Duduhacıoğlu, Başak; Rittersberger Tılıç, Helga İda; Department of Sociology (2012)
The main concern of this thesis is to analyze the transformation of domestic human rights discourse by looking at the shifting representations of the idea of human rights. The representation of the idea of human rights in ‘Turkey Human Rights Movement Conferences’ in different political contexts during the period 1998-2010 is evaluated with reference to three areas of literature on the idea of human rights and with a social constructionist perspective which begins with the proposition that ideas and practic...
Assessing the human rights regime of the Council of Europe in terms of economic and social rights
Milli, Ece; Okyayuz, Mehmet; Department of European Studies (2012)
This thesis seeks to answer the question whether economic and social rights have the same status with civil and political rights under the human rights regime of the Council of Europe. To this end, the thesis examines the assumptions with regard to the nature of economic and social rights, on the one hand, and civil and political rights, on the other. Second, it seeks to find out whether the nature of economic and social rights is different from that of civil and political rights. Third, it examines how the...
Question concerning the universality of human rights: a comparative examination of the works of Donnelly, Nino, and Ferry and Renaut
Demiray, Mehmet Ruhi; Deveci, Cem; Department of Political Science and Public Administration (2003)
From the if century when the idea pfhurnan rights has been first articulated m the history of humankind to our age, the adherents of miş Idea have generally asserted that these rights have a universal, thus an ahistorical and trafiscultural, character in their scope of validity. However, even a superficial review of the recent human rights literature is sufficient to give one the insight mat the question of the ground of this universality is the most crucial issue in the current theoretical debates on human...
Institutionalization of human rights in Turkey : experiences and perceptions of women’s human rights activists and state officials
Arıner, Hakkı Onur; Acar, Ayşe Feride; Department of Political Science and Public Administration (2013)
This thesis contends that human rights advocates’ dismissal of attempts by the state in Turkey to institutionalize human rights since the 1990s as insincere or as efforts to delimit and control human rights advocacy is informed by the dominant historical narrative that posits a center-periphery dichotomy as key to explaining Turkey’s democratization process, as well as the actual experiences of the state’s failure to tolerate autonomous human rights institutions. This dismissal is contested on theoretical a...
Citation Formats
D. Altun, “Nietzsche and the human rights,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2006.