Ideological issues in George Orwell’s works; a study of burmese days, keep the aspidistra flying and nineteen eighty-four

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2008
Umay Yurduseven, Menşure
This thesis analysis George Orwell’s three novels; Burmese Days, Keep the Aspidistra Flying and Nineteen Eighty-Four in terms of the main political ideas expressed through these works. It begins with an overview of Orwell as a political writer and the political atmosphere of the era. The thesis then asserts that the novels are used as a form of propaganda by the writer. The central political ideas that appear in the novels are imperialism in Burmese Days, capitalism in Keep the Aspidistra Flying and totalitarianism in Nineteen Eighty-Four. This dissertation is therefore primarily organized around these topics, and Orwell’s use of his novels as a way of conveying his political message will be illustrated and exemplified in the study.

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Citation Formats
M. Umay Yurduseven, “Ideological issues in George Orwell’s works; a study of burmese days, keep the aspidistra flying and nineteen eighty-four,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2008.