The ostracising of the unlike in H.G.Wells’s "The Time Machine", "The Island of Dr. Moreau" and "The Invisible Man" based on a pessimistic interpretation of T.H.Huxley’s "evolution and ethics"

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2009
İnci, Orkun
This thesis analyses the ostracising of the unlike as social criticism in H.G.Wells’s The Time Machine, The Island of Dr. Moreau and The Invisible Man against a background of T.H.Huxley’s cosmic pessimism in his work Evolution and Ethics. The thesis claims that Wells puts mankind’s future on an ever darkening line of evolution, or in other words devolution. Wells, although he is an admirer of Huxley, shows a more sceptical and cynical attitude in the assessment of the capabilities and nature of mankind. The three novels constituting the subject of the present study bears the stamp of this scepticism in increasingly pessimistic degrees.

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Citation Formats
O. İnci, “The ostracising of the unlike in H.G.Wells’s “The Time Machine”, “The Island of Dr. Moreau” and “The Invisible Man” based on a pessimistic interpretation of T.H.Huxley’s “evolution and ethics”,” M.A. - Master of Arts, Middle East Technical University, 2009.