A Third world feminist approach to femaleness as inferior to maleness in Doris Lessing’s the grass is singing and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s nervous conditions

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2014
Kara, Mustafa
This thesis analyses the inferiority of femaleness to maleness regardless of the skin colour in the works, The Grass is Singing, by Doris Lessing, and Nervous Conditions, by Tsitsi Dangarembga. While the patriarchal system allows men to oppress women both physically and spiritually, the colonial structure, constituting the basis for the Third World feminism, lets them make use of women according to their own profits. Additionally, the rights of women are abused in a specific way to support the colonial structure and to preserve the process of oppression. Functioning as a vicious circle, the process of colonization and the synthesis of the patriarchal system of the colonizer and the colonized serve for the undermining process of women in the fields of education, politics, law, and economics. Within the frames of the colonial patriarchal system, no matter what the colour of skin is, a woman is a woman and should lead her life according to the requirements and structures of the imposed system
Citation Formats
M. Kara, “A Third world feminist approach to femaleness as inferior to maleness in Doris Lessing’s the grass is singing and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s nervous conditions,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2014.