Situational strength based on culture as a moderator of the personality-job performance relationship

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2015
Yağcı, Hazal
The purpose of the present study is to examine the moderating influence of cultural dimensions on the relationship between personality and job performance. The main focus is on the situational strength framework (Meyer & Dalal, 2009) which claims that characteristics of situations moderate the relationship between personality and outcomes, in this case job performance. In the current study, situations are studied in terms of cultural characteristics that also pertain to organizations; namely uncertainty avoidance, power distance, and masculinity-femininity (Hofstede, 1980; 2001). The expectation is that in strong situations, which are defined as those with higher levels of uncertainty avoidance, power distance, masculinity/lower levels of femininity, the relationship between personality and job performance will be weaker when compared to weak situations. The data related to personality and culture dimensions were collected from employees working in Turkey and in Germany, while their immediate supervisors rated their performance in terms of task performance and several organizational citizenship behaviors. Matched data from 120 employees and their supervisors were analyzed to test the hypotheses. Findings showed that there were several personality-job performance relationships moderated by cultural dimensions. Firstly, power distance moderated the conscientiousness-task performance, and -personal industry relationships. For lower power distance, conscientiousness positively predicted both task performance and personal industry. Furthermore, masculinity/femininity moderated the conscientiousness-, and extraversion-loyal boosterism relationships. For the low masculinity/high femininity level, both conscientiousness and extraversion had a positive association with loyal boosterism. Results are discussed together with the limitations and strengths. Implications for practitioners and suggestions for future research are presented