The Imperial club revisited: the transformation of spatial politics in E. M. Forster’s A Passage to India and James Frey’s Bright Shiny Morning

Download
2016
Karabıyık, İrem
Space politics in the colonial and neo-colonial era is a lucrative field of research. With the aim of contributing to this field, this study brings together two different novels, A Passage To India (1924) by E.M. Forster and Bright Shiny Morning (2008) by James Frey. The thesis emphasizes the use of space in both novels for political and economic reasons showing that power is granted to ones who are mostly white in societies and that “white” spaces are the control points for distribution of power within societies. The significance of the thesis is that it lays bare the notion of spatial politics of the colonial and neo-colonial eras, while showing how it operates on the black and white dichotomies in two different time periods. The focus point in A Passage to India is centered upon the hill stations and their significance in denoting power; while in the Bright Shiny Morning the same notions are depicted via golf clubs and the homes of the upper class. The thesis also shows the place of the other in servitude positions, putting forth the idea that the other can breach the barriers of White spaces by being servants.
Citation Formats
İ. Karabıyık, “The Imperial club revisited: the transformation of spatial politics in E. M. Forster’s A Passage to India and James Frey’s Bright Shiny Morning,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2016.