Role of Personal and Organizational Factors on Student Attrition From Graduate Education: A Mixed-Model Research

2019-10-11
Ertem, Hasan Yucel
Gökalp, Gökçe
Students in graduate education have a desire to hold a degree because of contributions of graduate education such as opportunity to become faculty member, professional development, and promotion. Despite these benefits of graduate education, there are students who do not persist on gaining a graduate degree. This study aims to develop and test a model to determine the role of personal and organizational factors on student attrition from graduate education and to investigate graduate student attrition from the lenses of students and faculty. The design of the study was mixed-model research. Through a three-staged clustered random sampling and purposeful sampling, respectively, 653 and 36 participants were selected. Results of the correlational analysis indicated that intention to leave graduate education was predicted by personal factors, while the phenomenological part of the study pointed out that personal factors were more visible in student attrition than organizational factors.

Citation Formats
H. Y. Ertem and G. Gökalp, “Role of Personal and Organizational Factors on Student Attrition From Graduate Education: A Mixed-Model Research,” JOURNAL OF COLLEGE STUDENT RETENTION-RESEARCH THEORY & PRACTICE, pp. 0–0, 2019, Accessed: 00, 2020. [Online]. Available: https://hdl.handle.net/11511/41841.