Animal Exploitation at The Late Pleistocene- Holocene Transition in Upper Mesopotamia (10.900 – 7.700 CAL. BC) With A Focus on A Proposed Hunter-Gatherer Crisis

2021-6
Torun, Ahmet Onur
This study focuses on the archaeofaunal data from early prehistoric communities in Upper Mesopotamia (Euphrates, Tigris and Urfa regions) to understand whether the changing settlement pattern was interlinked with the changing climatic conditions. So far, many studies were undertaken on ecological data to understand the human subsistence strategies, but unfortunately, these studies focused on one settlement, one species of animals or one targeted question. In this study, environmental data on climate are reviewed to create a clear picture of the climatic conditions that prevailed during the transitions from Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene. Having reviewed prehistoric climate patterns, this study proceeds with the revaluation of 14C samples/dates from settlements aiming to clarify uncertainities in dating and understand the continuity/disruption of settlement patterns. Foremost, the main focus on this study is the review of published archaeofaunal data from selected Epipalaeolithic and Early Neolithic communities from Euphrates and Tigris. Here I use site-specific faunal data to understand which animals were consumed and to what proportions through time. It is expected that by examining together the faunal data and the recreated past climatic conditions within the time range derived from the 14C v dates, we will reach a better understanding of a potential PPNA hunter-gatherer crisis in this region.

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Citation Formats
A. O. Torun, “Animal Exploitation at The Late Pleistocene- Holocene Transition in Upper Mesopotamia (10.900 – 7.700 CAL. BC) With A Focus on A Proposed Hunter-Gatherer Crisis,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2021.