The changing portrayal of women in the novels of Anne Bronte, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot and D.H. Lawrence

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2009
Korkmaz, Ayşegül
This thesis analyses the women characters in four novels, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Shirley, The Mill on the Floss and Sons and Lovers. The first chapter gives information on the historical background of the Victorian period and early 20th century in England in which the novels were written, on the biography of the authors of the novels and clarifies the aim and methodology of the study. The following chapters analyse the women charaters - Helen Huntingdon, Shirley Keeldar, Maggie Tulliver and Clara Dawes - selected for study according to how far they went against social norms, perceptions about women and society's morals, and provide a general evaluation of each character. The conclusion presents a comparison of the four women characters' attitudes, and asserts that each of them display a controversial attitude in at least one of these areas, considering the period in which the novels were written.

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Citation Formats
A. Korkmaz, “The changing portrayal of women in the novels of Anne Bronte, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot and D.H. Lawrence,” M.A. - Master of Arts, Middle East Technical University, 2009.