The Concept of disinterestedness in modern philosophy of art: Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Heidegger

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2016
Akkökler Karatekeli, Büşra
This thesis aims to investigate the concept of disinterestedness in the modern philosophy of art. To this end, I firstly attempt to elucidate how this concept is described and gained its specific meaning in Kant. Then, I focus on Schopenhauer’s salient contribution to the discussion of aesthetic disinterestedness – thought along with his metaphysics –, namely the body, and attempt to bring into view the relation between the body and aesthetic disinterestedness. In the following, I investigate how Nietzsche’s thought concerning the concept of disinterestedness has shifted from the partial approval of the concept to its criticism by emphasising the physiological aspect of aesthetic experience. Bearing in mind Schopenhauer’s emphasis on the role of the body, I discuss that its function in aesthetic experience is fully developed in Nietzsche. To elaborate Nietzsche’s shift on the concept of disinterestedness, I discuss the concepts of Apollinian and Dionysian art drives, Rausch, and lastly the affirmation and denial of life. Finally, I investigate Heidegger’s understanding of the concept of disinterestedness. For this purpose, I problematise his claims as to the instigator of the misreading of this concept, namely Schopenhauer, and as to the link he draws between Kant and Nietzsche by paying attention to the concepts of pleasure of reflection and interest.
Citation Formats
B. Akkökler Karatekeli, “The Concept of disinterestedness in modern philosophy of art: Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Heidegger,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2016.