Mothers’ perceived partner responsiveness indirecty predict implicit infant attitude through implicit partner attitude

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2017
Yalçıntaş, Sümeyra
The study is first to examine determinants of maternal implicit attitude. Based on the important role of perceived partner responsiveness on close-relationships and attachment theory, we suggested perceived partner responsiveness as the predictor of maternal implicit attitude. We expected that partner responsiveness to be associated with maternal implicit attitude through implicit partner attitude, maternal depression and distress. Importantly, we tested our hypothesis also for maternal explicit attitude to compare maternal implicit and explicit attitude. One hundred twenty one mothers of 6-24 months old infants participated to the study. Mothers completed an online survey along with an implicit attitude measure: Affect Misattribution Procedure (AMP). The results demonstrated that perceived partner responsiveness was associated with maternal implicit attitude through implicit partner attitude but not through maternal depression or distress and it was related with maternal explicit attitude through maternal distress but not through maternal depression or implicit partner attitude. Mothers who perceived their husbands as more responsive also indicated more positive implicit attitude toward their infants through more positive implicit partner attitude and those mothers also had more positive explicit attitude toward their infants through decreased maternal distress. The findings show promise for studying maternal attitude in parent-child relationship research and suggest implications for intervention studies and therapy settings.
Citation Formats
S. Yalçıntaş, “Mothers’ perceived partner responsiveness indirecty predict implicit infant attitude through implicit partner attitude,” M.S. - Master of Science, Middle East Technical University, 2017.