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Job Satisfaction Among Turkish Teachers Exploring Differences by School Level

2014-05-01
Buyukgoze-Kavas, Aysenur
Duffy, Ryan
Güneri, Oya
Autin, Kelsey
This study aimed to examine how variables from a social cognitive model of job satisfaction-goal progress, self-efficacy, perceived organizational support, and positive affect-predicted the job satisfaction of Turkish teachers. Additionally, the study investigated the extent to which these relations differed according to school level. Study participants comprised 500 teachers (73% women and 27% men) employed by state schools at various levels in Ankara, Turkey, with an average of 19 years of teaching experience. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed teacher job satisfaction to be significantly and positively predicted by perceived organizational support, goal progress, and positive affect. There was also a significant interaction between school type and goal progress and a significant interaction between school type and perceived organizational support. For elementary school teachers, perceived organizational support was more highly related to satisfaction than for high school teachers and especially secondary school teachers. For secondary school teachers, goal progress was more highly related to job satisfaction than for high school teachers, and especially elementary teachers. Implications for research and practice are discussed.