The Role of women’s education level in their financial participation and experiences of economic violence in the family

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2019
Açıkalın, Gözde
This study aims to investigate the role of women’s education level in their participation in financial decision-making process and access to resources by considering women’s perceptions, experiences, reactions and coping strategies of economic violence in the family. The data is collected through in-depth interviews; 30 married women participate in this research. 15 of them have university education, while 15 of them have high school education. The findings can be briefly expressed through four main themes, which are namely women’s participation in the labour market, social support, versatile identity construction and access to information. Firstly, education provides a possibility to strengthen through such opportunities as allowing an occupation, quality of job and economic independency. Secondly, women, who have more social support such as family support and social network, both feel and become stronger in case of domestic violence. Thirdly, women with higher education establish versatile identities based on work as well as home, and in the case of destruction of one of their identities based on home, women stay stronger. It makes possible to oppose violence including economic form. Lastly, higher educated women have easier access to information of economic violence and rights. In light of all discussions in the study, even though both groups of women are exposed to various forms of economic violence in their families, higher educated women have more financial participation. In a parallel manner they experience economic violence less than the other group, and they signify and cope with it in their families easier.
Citation Formats
G. Açıkalın, “The Role of women’s education level in their financial participation and experiences of economic violence in the family,” Thesis (M.S.) -- Graduate School of Social Sciences. Gender and Women’s Studies., 2019.