Aristotle's Two Cities: Reducing Diversity to Homogeneity

Download
2014-01-01
It has often been argued, in scholarly debate, that Aristotle's denial of citizenship to the working population of his ideal city in Book VII of the Politics constitutes a fundamental injustice. According to this view, although it is true that their way of life prevents them from living a morally virtuous life, it does not follow that the working people are naturally devoid of the human qualities required for such a life. So, rather than finding a just way to distribute citizenship among the diversity a city's population would naturally exhibit (as he does, to a certain extent, in Book III), Aristotle would commit himself to oligarchic measures in Book VII. In this article, it is argued that the main concern of Book VII is less with a just determination of the extent of citizenship (unlike Book III) than with conceiving the most efficient way for a city to be happy: this consists in establishing a community composed of individuals who lay claim to happiness in the same way and to the same degree. In other words, it consists in reducing the diversity of Book III to a certain kind of homogeneity.

Suggestions

Plato's solution of the problem of falsehood in The Sophist
Uçak, Özgür; Grünberg, David; Department of Philosophy (2005)
The main concern of this thesis is to show Plato̕s solution of the problem of falsehood in his dialogue of the Sophist. In the Sophist, it is argued that false statements are the expressions of something which are not real by Plato. On the other hand, what is not real has been considered as what does not exist, namely, as non-being in the ontological tradition until Plato. Furthermore, non-being can neither be thought nor be stated; since thought must be thought of something which exists. Therefore, to spea...
Thomas Hobbes and Carl Schmitt on the tension between sovereign and law
Ünlü, Özlem; Turan, Şeref Halil; Department of Philosophy (2018)
This thesis aims at developing an understanding of the vital role that the political decision plays in the tension between sovereign and law through an examination of the constitutional theories of Thomas Hobbes and Carl Schmitt. In Schmitt’s classic work Dictatorship of 1921, the sovereign decision derives its legitimacy from its norm-preserving power, whereas in Political Theology appeared in 1922, it legitimizes itself on basis of the norm-giving power. In The Concept of the Political, the decision on wh...
The possibility of conceiving universal human rights in the sixteenth century political theory : the views of Vitoria and Las Casas
Albayrak, Aydın; Deveci, Cem; Department of Political Science and Public Administration (2004)
In this thesis,it has been aimed to evaluate the claims of which argue that the human rights thought has been firstly formulated by Francisco de Vitoria and Bartolome de Las Casas in the early sixteenth century Spain.
Question concerning the universality of human rights: a comparative examination of the works of Donnelly, Nino, and Ferry and Renaut
Demiray, Mehmet Ruhi; Deveci, Cem; Department of Political Science and Public Administration (2003)
From the if century when the idea pfhurnan rights has been first articulated m the history of humankind to our age, the adherents of miş Idea have generally asserted that these rights have a universal, thus an ahistorical and trafiscultural, character in their scope of validity. However, even a superficial review of the recent human rights literature is sufficient to give one the insight mat the question of the ground of this universality is the most crucial issue in the current theoretical debates on human...
Heidegger’s fundamental ontology as a political project
Soysal, Zühtücan; Karademir, Aret; Department of Philosophy (2016)
Martin Heidegger’s fundamental ontology has long been debated in relation to Heidegger’s personal political affiliations with National Socialism, and there is a wide scope of interpretations as to whether his thought is essentially linked to the Nazi ideology. The customary way of reading the Heideggerian corpus within this context is to investigate whether or not the fundamental ontology yields a discriminatory political stance in favor of Germans over the rest of the people (or a group of them), and both ...
Citation Formats
R. Güremen, “Aristotle’s Two Cities: Reducing Diversity to Homogeneity,” POLIS, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 59–73, 2014, Accessed: 00, 2021. [Online]. Available: https://hdl.handle.net/11511/93758.