Broad maternal geographic origin of domestic sheep in Anatolia and the Zagros

2022-03-01
Her, Charlotte
Rezaei, Hamid-Reza
Hughes, Sandrine
Naderi, Saeid
Duffraisse, Marilyne
Mashkour, Marjan
Naghash, Hamid-Reza
Balasescu, Adrian
Luikart, Gordon
Jordan, Steve
Ozut, Deniz
KENCE, AYKUT
Bruford, Michael W.
Tresset, Anne
Vigne, Jean-Denis
Taberlet, Pierre
Hanni, Catherine
Pompanon, Francois
We investigated the controversial origin of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) using large samples of contemporary and ancient domestic individuals and their closest wild relatives: the Asiatic mouflon (Ovis gmelini), the urial (Ovis vignei) and the argali (Ovis ammon). A phylogeny based on mitochondrial DNA, including 213 new cytochrome-b sequences of wild Ovism confirmed that O. gmelini is the maternal ancestor of sheep and precluded mtDNA contributions from O. vignei (and O. gmelini x O. vignei hybrids) to domestic lineages. We also produced 54 new control region sequences showing shared haplogroups (A, B, C and E) between domestic sheep and wild O. gmelini which localized the domestication center in eastern Anatolia and central Zagros, excluding regions further east where exclusively wild haplogroups were found. This overlaps with the geographic distribution of O. gmelini gmelini, further suggesting that the maternal origin of domestic sheep derives from this subspecies. Additionally, we produced 57 new CR sequences of Neolithic sheep remains from a large area covering Anatolia to Europe, showing the early presence of at least three mitochondrial haplogroups (A, B and D) in Western colonization routes. This confirmed that sheep domestication was a large-scale process that captured diverse maternal lineages (haplogroups).
ANIMAL GENETICS

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Citation Formats
C. Her et al., “Broad maternal geographic origin of domestic sheep in Anatolia and the Zagros,” ANIMAL GENETICS, pp. 0–0, 2022, Accessed: 00, 2022. [Online]. Available: https://hdl.handle.net/11511/97130.