Unilateral deep brain stimulation suppresses alpha and beta oscillations in sensorimotor cortices

2018-07-01
Abbasi, Omid
Hirschmann, Jan
Storzer, Lena
Özkurt, Tolga Esat
Elben, Saskia
Vesper, Jan
Wojtecki, Lars
Schmitz, Georg
Schnitzler, Alfons
Butz, Markus
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy to treat motor symptoms in movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The mechanisms leading to the high therapeutic effectiveness of DBS are poorly understood so far, but modulation of oscillatory activity is likely to play an important role. Thus, investigating the effect of DBS on cortical oscillatory activity can help clarifying the neurophysiological mechanisms of DBS. Here, we aimed at scrutinizing changes of cortical oscillatory activity by DBS at different frequencies using magneto-encephalography (MEG).

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Citation Formats
O. Abbasi et al., “Unilateral deep brain stimulation suppresses alpha and beta oscillations in sensorimotor cortices,” NEUROIMAGE, pp. 201–207, 2018, Accessed: 00, 2020. [Online]. Available: https://hdl.handle.net/11511/32487.